The team of ‘Code-municators’ who overcame the language barriers
8 min read

The team of ‘Code-municators’ who overcame the language barriers

Engineering
Nov 18
/
8 min read

The backend team of Tridge covers every part of the business, ranging from the platform for customers to internal tools for operation. Stephen, the lead of this powerful technical supporters, is now on his way to build the best infrastructure and a happy team to work in.

Being a French leader of a global company located in South Korea was not always an easy job. However, for Stephen, this is an opportunity that will bring him and Tridge another exponential growth.

Hi, Please Introduce yourself.

Hi, My name is Stephen. I am the head of the Backend Team at Tridge. I'm from France and I joined in early 2016 when Tridge was just a fresh startup. It’s been almost six years since I joined Tridge.

Can you introduce the main tasks of the backend team?

So the backend itself is quite broad in terms of description and we have very many responsibilities. So our main responsibility is definitely to serve the server requirements from all of our products. At Tridge, we have two main products. First is the customer-facing product, which is the “www.tridge.com” website, and we have a very large internal application as well. Second, our internal employees use what we call the “TMS”. So both of those websites require any kind of backend support and resources. 

To go into a little bit more detail about our tasks, we are responsible for the hosting of all of the servers, so we are responsible for the databases that we host on AWS. We are also using a lot of container environments, so we use Kubernetes and Elastic container services to host most of our website servers. We also use more framework resources such as Elasticsearch that we use to provide for the autocomplete predictions, or optimize some of our filtering performances that is mainly used as the core requirements of the backend team.

But it goes into more details when you look into the features that our website provides. So as you may have found out on Tridge.com, we provide a lot of intelligence information that can go from price data, news data, weather data or production. All of those data also are responsibilities of the backend team. In detail, the responsibility of the backend team is the collection, analysis, structure, and processing of the data, which means we are responsible for collecting the raw data, coordinating with the relevant teams to find what is the value and the structure in that data.

And once we have found this structure, the backend starts and we have to implement this for it to be used by our users. So that would be the main responsibility of the backend, basically just providing any server resources that any team may require. That can also include things a bit more close to marketing, such as sending emails, managing newsletters, campaign tools, and allowing eventually we call it data warehousing, as well as most of our employees may need to access some raw data to do their own computation and projections. So we also have to build the access for internal employees to consume our own internal data as well. That's a lot of things.

Looks like the backend team is very important. 

Every team ultimately has a relationship with the backend team. For example, let's talk about the Fulfillment part of the Tridge. Of course, the Fulfillment part is very operational, but this operation requires many features and tools that they need across their daily activities. So, for example, there’s a mailing system inside the TMS, then the backend team is responsible for how this mailing system will reach actual users and how to keep track of information when the Fulfillment team has to manage all of the financial risk and cash flows. We also have to implement the feature that also goes with those requirements. If you take an example of the Market Intelligence team, they will want to be able to create content. So we also have to build the service and the API to allow them to create those contents. So definitely all teams that have a technical requirement for their demands will ultimately go to the backend businesses.

Your team is handling quite many tasks, how can you manage such a high quality?

With this small number of engineers, we follow some rules that I can almost call principles. I would define them as trust because we have to trust each other, that everyone is doing the best they can. But also you have to trust in yourself that you are capable of doing things. 

Second one, I would say ambition, because of course, what we're trying to achieve is pretty large. So you need this kind of inner energy that you want to achieve things with this ambition. 

Next principle is responsibility. If the deadline is supposed to be Friday, you are responsible for meeting this deadline based on the capacity but also in terms of ownership. Once you have implemented the feature, you also have responsibility and ownership of making sure that this feature still works like monitoring performance and errors, or making some suggestions of how you can make it better. 

Then the next one would be the awareness. As I mentioned, we are involved in many different projects, which means a lot of them sometimes overlap either in purposes or just in technical environments, which means it's very important for every backend engineer to be aware of what everyone else is doing with the teams. Both to reduce inefficiency but also to help each other and to just go towards the same goal at the same time.

And the last one, I would say, is knowledge. As I mentioned, the backend concept itself has many different sub concepts like DevOps, infrastructure, database management, application building, API, skimas. All of those require a kind of large knowledge base. So it's very important to be someone that likes to learn, that looks for the information and is very excited about new things. We guarantee a proper workflow process for a good quality product by all these five principles.

How do you align and communicate with your teammates to maintain this culture and principles?

First, definitely when it comes to initial hiring, we try to make sure everyone that we hire has this flexibility and mindset that follows the culture. When everyone is aligned with the same goal we feed off each other, we provide energy for the team. Of course not everyone always agrees when we have discussions. But the ultimate goal we share is understanding why we are doing things. There’s always a reason for implementing things in the backend. Most of the alignment goes through team-level discussion, whether the thing is project layer or the team layer. 

I will say right now all people in Tridge have this mindset, and it's very easy for us when we have to lead a new project when we understand the ‘Why’. Because if you understand the why, it's very clear what is the purpose and the challenges that the implementation will face. It’s important not only because the why also affects how you implement things, but I think it's important for everyone to feel involved.

If I just tell someone to implement something where I don't tell them the purpose of it, they will miss the bigger picture. Maybe they will think that this feature is super small and boring and not important, but maybe it actually can block the potential of many multiple teams. So that's why I think understanding ‘why’ is important.

 

Are there any misaligns or conflicts between teammates?

It happens sometimes, of course. We're all humans, sometimes there's misunderstanding in the communication, but we try to follow up in the implementation process to make sure that those misalignments are found during the process, not at the end.

Sometimes there can be a misunderstanding on the design and then the implementation that follows through is kind of not expected. It is natural for them to happen, and I expect that to always happen. My responsibility is just to keep the communication open to make sure that people feel free to ask the questions to solve the misalignment.

What is the biggest project that the backend team is most interested in recently?

These days, the biggest project is we are trying to upgrade our internal technical infrastructure.

To give a little bit more technical detail, our backend is built with Python and Django. Currently up to now we have integrated with Python 2, but nowadays we are starting to find limitations in the ecosystem by staying in that version. So we want to upgrade to Python 3. However, since we have built this product for five years now, there are dependencies that exist by the version which requires us to upgrade everything. That is one big project that we're working on, and it takes us some resources and a lot of learning as well.

Another big project is at the same time, we are trying to enhance our infrastructure at the DevOps level as our user base is growing and we're getting more and more globalized, our server requirements are also becoming a little bit more demanding. So that's why we're implementing more container implementations with Kubernetes with automatic scaling, automatic deployments. That is also another big project that we're working on now.


So, future teammates may need experience with Python3?

There's no specific requirements for Python 3, because the knowledge between both Python 2 and 3  is still quite shared. So when we are hiring, we're not looking for people who specifically have knowledge, we know that those things can be taught.


Can you tell me more about your daily routine & schedule?

Sure, my daily routine is actually quite variable, but mostly it's going to be reviewing ongoing projects. So I'll be always sort of coordinating with the product or planning requirements, making sure that the resources are properly used in the team, knowing what are the oncoming projects that I can discuss with which resources can be used.’ ‘What is the technical requirement for this?’ ‘There are any consequences?’ etc.

Of course, I'm also involved with my own development as well. I have my own coding tasks to complete. 

I am also handling what I would call guidance. So that includes mentorship of the juniors or the seniors on a specific project, which would be something like code reviews, making sure that the code that they're working on right now is proper or teaching them a better way to do it.

It could be just guiding the technical implementation and direction of our infrastructure. For example, it could be discussing with our infrastructure engineer how we're going to handle the upgrade of the database next week, if there is some kind of requirement that we have to do because of security.


Tridge has a lot of multinational members. Were there any linguistic problems in developing?

Not so much because I think engineering is sort of an extra language. Even if we cannot speak all French or English or all Korean, we can express each other and understand technical concepts.The level of language in the team is quite different, we have some people fluent in English, some are middle-level and some don't really speak English at all, but we usually don’t have that much problem.

We also try to document everything as possible, which also makes people who are not comfortable speaking in English a bit more confident, because they are able to read and write in English. We always try to keep an environment where communication works, and we are very flexible in that aspect. So if some people are more comfortable with writing, they will have more conversations in writing. If they are more comfortable in speaking, then they will be able to speak in the meetings.

Can you give any advice for candidates who are hesitating to apply due to the linguistic difficulties?

I would say, just apply. Because you may be better than you think you are. It doesn't matter which language we speak as long as we can communicate.

So that's also part of the interview process,meeting and seeing if we understand each other. And of course we're going to be looking for people who are talented. If you're talented but you don't speak English, then we will try to find an environment which fits you and where you can grow as an advanced engineer.

So I would say do not worry about your English level. It's really just about confidence and working at Tridge will also help you build that confidence, Tridge has a perfect condition to become a global engineer.. It may sound scary, but especially in Korea, where the English education is pretty high, I would say that 90% of the candidates who think they cannot work in English actually can. 

We  have many employees who joined with a “low” (by their standards) level of English and just naturally picked it up over time while working with us, and now they can have normal conversations in English.


I want to grow and build a team where people feel happy and comfortable in it. Also, I want to build an environment where the team members can learn a lot, both technically but also humanly. I definitely think that the company wants to achieve great things and it’s our responsibility to help the company, but I want to get there by building a team and a place where people feel enjoyment in their day-by-day work.

And as for engineering itself, there are many things I would like to achieve in the company. 

As I mentioned earlier, we collect a lot of data. I do think that we can improve the technical aspect in which we consume that data. There are many technologies such as AI or machine learning that could be used and applied to our dataset to improve both the quality or size that we offer to our customers, but also internal usage as well.

I also want to optimize as much as we can to make our service global.l. So right now the company is in Korea and some of the servers are in Asia. In the long term, to guarantee the performance, we might need servers hosted globally. So maybe having some servers in France, maybe having some servers in the United States, which will require quite the overall of the technical infrastructure as well. So that would be quite a great goal to have for the backend team.

And even with our current product, I think there are some improvements that can be done in the workflow process, optimizing the way we implement in the backend. But also, we're upgrading to Python3, which also gives us more tools and opportunities to use better features and better frameworks that I think can be quite valuable for our company.

As a team leader, which point makes you feel difficult to be a leader?

To me, having a long term vision is the difficulty that I’m facing. Building the backend is like building a house. So you need to be sure that your house is going to be sustainable for the long time. That's why when I ask juniors or other seniors to do some implementation, wealways review to make sure that it makes sense in the long term. That can be hard because it means you also have to build your long term vision, which is not a skill you’re born with but a skill that you have to develop over time.

I tend to be a very analytical person, which means I always try to find the logic in between things which some people can also find demanding. I think there is always a reason for doing things.What I pursue is giving a reasonable explanation to everything we do.Also I think it's very important for the backend team to be aligned with the company and understand the business model because we have to implement features focusing on Tridge’s vision.


When do you feel most proud after coming to Tridge?

I would definitely say the growth. At first, I didn’t imagine how big the company would become and also how big the effect of the company would have on the world. On the internal side, sometimes you can feel a bit disconnected. But if you think about it, you will realize that what I built yesterday is supporting a supplier in this whole country to grow. And maybe in this other country, someone had a life changing deal that can help their country, families or companies.

It's time to realize only that one building has an actual impact on society and realizing that maybe the products that are in buyer inquiry today is something that we sold. And I just realized that we're building something very important. And on the engineering side, I think my biggest pride is, basically, building responsibilities of features from A to Z. So right now I've been at Tridge for quite some time, but before I had leading responsibilities, I also experienced implementing engineering, and I had the flexibility and ability to implement things entirely by myself.

Of course team leaders and other colleagues supported me, but I had the opportunity to design the entire concept, implement it by myself, and also do research and learn by myself.

These are quite hard to experience in other companies because everything needs to be scaled up. So everything is split between many employees. So the responsibility and freedom that is given to the engineers are becoming lesser and lesser. But at Tridge, we try to give each teammate the ability forown the part that you're working on.

Even thoughI was a junior when I joined, and the project was sizable, Tridge gave me the opportunity to do it by myself. And I think that was quite a life changing experience for me in terms of personal growth. And definitely things like implementing the whole Elasticsearch in our system was quite exciting for me in terms of learning a new framework. I could learn  new concepts of languages and text processing. Also learning the DevOps infrastructure was quite interesting to me because when I first joined Tridge, it's not something I had experience with, but I grew to learn how to support the product, how to build an infrastructure, to support the goal and the purpose.


Do you have any specific feature or some project that you felt really proud about yourself?

The first thing I feel proud of is building a new feature. We collected a lot of news and we had to build a recommendation system regarding all those views and the users. So that was actually quite a prime moment for me because it felt like I was building something really big. It's really equivalent to a social Facebook feed where you have some algorithm which recommends the news according to the user's need and taste. And building this kind of recommendation that matches between news content and user experience requires some cross checking between the user activity and also the information containing the article. Furthermore, it requires processing the content of the article to extract the meaning. So when I started to implement this, I realized how broad the scope of it was, so I was delighted to be involved in this project..

The second one is the technical infrastructure that I built. I'm just really proud of our technical infrastructure such as the way our DevOps is set up and the way we handle our servers and deployments. I think that was quite a smart implementation of it, and I'm really quite happy that I have to review.


Can you say anything for future Tridge engineers?

Tridge is a great place to be, definitely as a company itself. It's growing quite well, so I think it's a safe place to be as an engineer. And it's an industry that we are trying to disrupt, which means there are so many engineering opportunities. What we're doing now as engineers is such a small part of what we can achieve and want to achieve. So if you were to join, there are so many projects that you can be working on, whether they are data science related, whether they are infrastructure related or back end and front end implementation.

There's so many projects that you can join and learn everything at the same time, we're very open to people who are curious. So I think if you are someone that has some curiosity about how things work in the world and how to implement them, Tridge is a great place to be. 

I think the mentality around the company is quite energetic. Tridge people really want to achieve things. People have a go-getter personality. So even if you are not that kind of person, I think you can just get some value from being around those kinds of people.

Being a Tridge engineer definitely was lucky for me  because I didn't expect Tridge to become this big company but I'm very happy that I made this decision, and I would definitely recommend people to give a chance to Tridge, and we will give a chance to you as well.

Join the backend team of Tridge!

👉Application Link for Juniors
👉Application Link for Seniors

If you have any further questions about the position or the company, please feel free to reach out through our Casual Chats.

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The team of ‘Code-municators’ who overcame the language barriers
8 min read

The team of ‘Code-municators’ who overcame the language barriers

Engineering
Nov 18
/
8 min read

The backend team of Tridge covers every part of the business, ranging from the platform for customers to internal tools for operation. Stephen, the lead of this powerful technical supporters, is now on his way to build the best infrastructure and a happy team to work in.

Being a French leader of a global company located in South Korea was not always an easy job. However, for Stephen, this is an opportunity that will bring him and Tridge another exponential growth.

Hi, Please Introduce yourself.

Hi, My name is Stephen. I am the head of the Backend Team at Tridge. I'm from France and I joined in early 2016 when Tridge was just a fresh startup. It’s been almost six years since I joined Tridge.

Can you introduce the main tasks of the backend team?

So the backend itself is quite broad in terms of description and we have very many responsibilities. So our main responsibility is definitely to serve the server requirements from all of our products. At Tridge, we have two main products. First is the customer-facing product, which is the “www.tridge.com” website, and we have a very large internal application as well. Second, our internal employees use what we call the “TMS”. So both of those websites require any kind of backend support and resources. 

To go into a little bit more detail about our tasks, we are responsible for the hosting of all of the servers, so we are responsible for the databases that we host on AWS. We are also using a lot of container environments, so we use Kubernetes and Elastic container services to host most of our website servers. We also use more framework resources such as Elasticsearch that we use to provide for the autocomplete predictions, or optimize some of our filtering performances that is mainly used as the core requirements of the backend team.

But it goes into more details when you look into the features that our website provides. So as you may have found out on Tridge.com, we provide a lot of intelligence information that can go from price data, news data, weather data or production. All of those data also are responsibilities of the backend team. In detail, the responsibility of the backend team is the collection, analysis, structure, and processing of the data, which means we are responsible for collecting the raw data, coordinating with the relevant teams to find what is the value and the structure in that data.

And once we have found this structure, the backend starts and we have to implement this for it to be used by our users. So that would be the main responsibility of the backend, basically just providing any server resources that any team may require. That can also include things a bit more close to marketing, such as sending emails, managing newsletters, campaign tools, and allowing eventually we call it data warehousing, as well as most of our employees may need to access some raw data to do their own computation and projections. So we also have to build the access for internal employees to consume our own internal data as well. That's a lot of things.

Looks like the backend team is very important. 

Every team ultimately has a relationship with the backend team. For example, let's talk about the Fulfillment part of the Tridge. Of course, the Fulfillment part is very operational, but this operation requires many features and tools that they need across their daily activities. So, for example, there’s a mailing system inside the TMS, then the backend team is responsible for how this mailing system will reach actual users and how to keep track of information when the Fulfillment team has to manage all of the financial risk and cash flows. We also have to implement the feature that also goes with those requirements. If you take an example of the Market Intelligence team, they will want to be able to create content. So we also have to build the service and the API to allow them to create those contents. So definitely all teams that have a technical requirement for their demands will ultimately go to the backend businesses.

Your team is handling quite many tasks, how can you manage such a high quality?

With this small number of engineers, we follow some rules that I can almost call principles. I would define them as trust because we have to trust each other, that everyone is doing the best they can. But also you have to trust in yourself that you are capable of doing things. 

Second one, I would say ambition, because of course, what we're trying to achieve is pretty large. So you need this kind of inner energy that you want to achieve things with this ambition. 

Next principle is responsibility. If the deadline is supposed to be Friday, you are responsible for meeting this deadline based on the capacity but also in terms of ownership. Once you have implemented the feature, you also have responsibility and ownership of making sure that this feature still works like monitoring performance and errors, or making some suggestions of how you can make it better. 

Then the next one would be the awareness. As I mentioned, we are involved in many different projects, which means a lot of them sometimes overlap either in purposes or just in technical environments, which means it's very important for every backend engineer to be aware of what everyone else is doing with the teams. Both to reduce inefficiency but also to help each other and to just go towards the same goal at the same time.

And the last one, I would say, is knowledge. As I mentioned, the backend concept itself has many different sub concepts like DevOps, infrastructure, database management, application building, API, skimas. All of those require a kind of large knowledge base. So it's very important to be someone that likes to learn, that looks for the information and is very excited about new things. We guarantee a proper workflow process for a good quality product by all these five principles.

How do you align and communicate with your teammates to maintain this culture and principles?

First, definitely when it comes to initial hiring, we try to make sure everyone that we hire has this flexibility and mindset that follows the culture. When everyone is aligned with the same goal we feed off each other, we provide energy for the team. Of course not everyone always agrees when we have discussions. But the ultimate goal we share is understanding why we are doing things. There’s always a reason for implementing things in the backend. Most of the alignment goes through team-level discussion, whether the thing is project layer or the team layer. 

I will say right now all people in Tridge have this mindset, and it's very easy for us when we have to lead a new project when we understand the ‘Why’. Because if you understand the why, it's very clear what is the purpose and the challenges that the implementation will face. It’s important not only because the why also affects how you implement things, but I think it's important for everyone to feel involved.

If I just tell someone to implement something where I don't tell them the purpose of it, they will miss the bigger picture. Maybe they will think that this feature is super small and boring and not important, but maybe it actually can block the potential of many multiple teams. So that's why I think understanding ‘why’ is important.

 

Are there any misaligns or conflicts between teammates?

It happens sometimes, of course. We're all humans, sometimes there's misunderstanding in the communication, but we try to follow up in the implementation process to make sure that those misalignments are found during the process, not at the end.

Sometimes there can be a misunderstanding on the design and then the implementation that follows through is kind of not expected. It is natural for them to happen, and I expect that to always happen. My responsibility is just to keep the communication open to make sure that people feel free to ask the questions to solve the misalignment.

What is the biggest project that the backend team is most interested in recently?

These days, the biggest project is we are trying to upgrade our internal technical infrastructure.

To give a little bit more technical detail, our backend is built with Python and Django. Currently up to now we have integrated with Python 2, but nowadays we are starting to find limitations in the ecosystem by staying in that version. So we want to upgrade to Python 3. However, since we have built this product for five years now, there are dependencies that exist by the version which requires us to upgrade everything. That is one big project that we're working on, and it takes us some resources and a lot of learning as well.

Another big project is at the same time, we are trying to enhance our infrastructure at the DevOps level as our user base is growing and we're getting more and more globalized, our server requirements are also becoming a little bit more demanding. So that's why we're implementing more container implementations with Kubernetes with automatic scaling, automatic deployments. That is also another big project that we're working on now.


So, future teammates may need experience with Python3?

There's no specific requirements for Python 3, because the knowledge between both Python 2 and 3  is still quite shared. So when we are hiring, we're not looking for people who specifically have knowledge, we know that those things can be taught.


Can you tell me more about your daily routine & schedule?

Sure, my daily routine is actually quite variable, but mostly it's going to be reviewing ongoing projects. So I'll be always sort of coordinating with the product or planning requirements, making sure that the resources are properly used in the team, knowing what are the oncoming projects that I can discuss with which resources can be used.’ ‘What is the technical requirement for this?’ ‘There are any consequences?’ etc.

Of course, I'm also involved with my own development as well. I have my own coding tasks to complete. 

I am also handling what I would call guidance. So that includes mentorship of the juniors or the seniors on a specific project, which would be something like code reviews, making sure that the code that they're working on right now is proper or teaching them a better way to do it.

It could be just guiding the technical implementation and direction of our infrastructure. For example, it could be discussing with our infrastructure engineer how we're going to handle the upgrade of the database next week, if there is some kind of requirement that we have to do because of security.


Tridge has a lot of multinational members. Were there any linguistic problems in developing?

Not so much because I think engineering is sort of an extra language. Even if we cannot speak all French or English or all Korean, we can express each other and understand technical concepts.The level of language in the team is quite different, we have some people fluent in English, some are middle-level and some don't really speak English at all, but we usually don’t have that much problem.

We also try to document everything as possible, which also makes people who are not comfortable speaking in English a bit more confident, because they are able to read and write in English. We always try to keep an environment where communication works, and we are very flexible in that aspect. So if some people are more comfortable with writing, they will have more conversations in writing. If they are more comfortable in speaking, then they will be able to speak in the meetings.

Can you give any advice for candidates who are hesitating to apply due to the linguistic difficulties?

I would say, just apply. Because you may be better than you think you are. It doesn't matter which language we speak as long as we can communicate.

So that's also part of the interview process,meeting and seeing if we understand each other. And of course we're going to be looking for people who are talented. If you're talented but you don't speak English, then we will try to find an environment which fits you and where you can grow as an advanced engineer.

So I would say do not worry about your English level. It's really just about confidence and working at Tridge will also help you build that confidence, Tridge has a perfect condition to become a global engineer.. It may sound scary, but especially in Korea, where the English education is pretty high, I would say that 90% of the candidates who think they cannot work in English actually can. 

We  have many employees who joined with a “low” (by their standards) level of English and just naturally picked it up over time while working with us, and now they can have normal conversations in English.


I want to grow and build a team where people feel happy and comfortable in it. Also, I want to build an environment where the team members can learn a lot, both technically but also humanly. I definitely think that the company wants to achieve great things and it’s our responsibility to help the company, but I want to get there by building a team and a place where people feel enjoyment in their day-by-day work.

And as for engineering itself, there are many things I would like to achieve in the company. 

As I mentioned earlier, we collect a lot of data. I do think that we can improve the technical aspect in which we consume that data. There are many technologies such as AI or machine learning that could be used and applied to our dataset to improve both the quality or size that we offer to our customers, but also internal usage as well.

I also want to optimize as much as we can to make our service global.l. So right now the company is in Korea and some of the servers are in Asia. In the long term, to guarantee the performance, we might need servers hosted globally. So maybe having some servers in France, maybe having some servers in the United States, which will require quite the overall of the technical infrastructure as well. So that would be quite a great goal to have for the backend team.

And even with our current product, I think there are some improvements that can be done in the workflow process, optimizing the way we implement in the backend. But also, we're upgrading to Python3, which also gives us more tools and opportunities to use better features and better frameworks that I think can be quite valuable for our company.

As a team leader, which point makes you feel difficult to be a leader?

To me, having a long term vision is the difficulty that I’m facing. Building the backend is like building a house. So you need to be sure that your house is going to be sustainable for the long time. That's why when I ask juniors or other seniors to do some implementation, wealways review to make sure that it makes sense in the long term. That can be hard because it means you also have to build your long term vision, which is not a skill you’re born with but a skill that you have to develop over time.

I tend to be a very analytical person, which means I always try to find the logic in between things which some people can also find demanding. I think there is always a reason for doing things.What I pursue is giving a reasonable explanation to everything we do.Also I think it's very important for the backend team to be aligned with the company and understand the business model because we have to implement features focusing on Tridge’s vision.


When do you feel most proud after coming to Tridge?

I would definitely say the growth. At first, I didn’t imagine how big the company would become and also how big the effect of the company would have on the world. On the internal side, sometimes you can feel a bit disconnected. But if you think about it, you will realize that what I built yesterday is supporting a supplier in this whole country to grow. And maybe in this other country, someone had a life changing deal that can help their country, families or companies.

It's time to realize only that one building has an actual impact on society and realizing that maybe the products that are in buyer inquiry today is something that we sold. And I just realized that we're building something very important. And on the engineering side, I think my biggest pride is, basically, building responsibilities of features from A to Z. So right now I've been at Tridge for quite some time, but before I had leading responsibilities, I also experienced implementing engineering, and I had the flexibility and ability to implement things entirely by myself.

Of course team leaders and other colleagues supported me, but I had the opportunity to design the entire concept, implement it by myself, and also do research and learn by myself.

These are quite hard to experience in other companies because everything needs to be scaled up. So everything is split between many employees. So the responsibility and freedom that is given to the engineers are becoming lesser and lesser. But at Tridge, we try to give each teammate the ability forown the part that you're working on.

Even thoughI was a junior when I joined, and the project was sizable, Tridge gave me the opportunity to do it by myself. And I think that was quite a life changing experience for me in terms of personal growth. And definitely things like implementing the whole Elasticsearch in our system was quite exciting for me in terms of learning a new framework. I could learn  new concepts of languages and text processing. Also learning the DevOps infrastructure was quite interesting to me because when I first joined Tridge, it's not something I had experience with, but I grew to learn how to support the product, how to build an infrastructure, to support the goal and the purpose.


Do you have any specific feature or some project that you felt really proud about yourself?

The first thing I feel proud of is building a new feature. We collected a lot of news and we had to build a recommendation system regarding all those views and the users. So that was actually quite a prime moment for me because it felt like I was building something really big. It's really equivalent to a social Facebook feed where you have some algorithm which recommends the news according to the user's need and taste. And building this kind of recommendation that matches between news content and user experience requires some cross checking between the user activity and also the information containing the article. Furthermore, it requires processing the content of the article to extract the meaning. So when I started to implement this, I realized how broad the scope of it was, so I was delighted to be involved in this project..

The second one is the technical infrastructure that I built. I'm just really proud of our technical infrastructure such as the way our DevOps is set up and the way we handle our servers and deployments. I think that was quite a smart implementation of it, and I'm really quite happy that I have to review.


Can you say anything for future Tridge engineers?

Tridge is a great place to be, definitely as a company itself. It's growing quite well, so I think it's a safe place to be as an engineer. And it's an industry that we are trying to disrupt, which means there are so many engineering opportunities. What we're doing now as engineers is such a small part of what we can achieve and want to achieve. So if you were to join, there are so many projects that you can be working on, whether they are data science related, whether they are infrastructure related or back end and front end implementation.

There's so many projects that you can join and learn everything at the same time, we're very open to people who are curious. So I think if you are someone that has some curiosity about how things work in the world and how to implement them, Tridge is a great place to be. 

I think the mentality around the company is quite energetic. Tridge people really want to achieve things. People have a go-getter personality. So even if you are not that kind of person, I think you can just get some value from being around those kinds of people.

Being a Tridge engineer definitely was lucky for me  because I didn't expect Tridge to become this big company but I'm very happy that I made this decision, and I would definitely recommend people to give a chance to Tridge, and we will give a chance to you as well.

Join the backend team of Tridge!

👉Application Link for Juniors
👉Application Link for Seniors

If you have any further questions about the position or the company, please feel free to reach out through our Casual Chats.

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