Tridge becomes influential in Mexico Avocado market
6 min read

Tridge becomes influential in Mexico Avocado market

Company
Mar 16
/
6 min read

Mexican Avocado farms, whose family runs avocado farms in the State of Mexico for three generations, recently closed the deal with a German distributor to sell tons of avocados.

It is unusual for a Mexican avocado orchard to export avocados to countries other than the United States. Many farmers are not familiar with developing new export channels and struggle with local regulations in different countries.

With its high reliance on the U.S. market, the Mexican Avocado market has a unique market dynamic. Here, instead of multiple intermediaries, the packing houses play an outsized role. Packing houses buy directly from orchards send it right to the shipments to importers at destination countries. In the process, orchards do not have comprehensive options to sell their products at competitive prices.

Tridge’s role

Provides competition

Tridge's impact here is firstly in providing competition to traditionally influential players. One key advantage of Tridge over packing houses is its ability to help jump the trade barriers. For example, when avocado farmers tried to export avocados to Germany, certain local food regulations hindered the process because it took too much time to keep the freshness of their products. Many buyers find themselves in a similar situation to Carlos.

Tridge recently helped the farmers to jump those hurdles on behalf of him. Tridge's one-stop fulfillment service facilitates this, including due diligence, supplier certificate verification, contract negotiation, packaging, shipping, customs, and many more.

Provides Consistency

Another advantage is Tridge's ability to provide consistency. One primary concern for avocado buyers is that they receive products in sizes they do not want. Furthermore, some suppliers fail to keep the freshness of avocado due to logistical failures.

Tridge offers buyers higher consistency in the combination of product grades ordered by the buyer, which has been their prime complaint towards packing houses.

For example, when a Canadian wholesaler from Montreal asked for 50% of avocado in a certain grade, Tridge kept that promise. As a result, this wholesaler came back with higher orders in the next season.

History of Tridge’s Mexican Avocado business

Tridge's business in Mexican Avocado dates back to 2019 when the Trump administration and Mexico clashed over the NAFTA deal. Trump administration threatened Mexico to nullify the NAFTA deal, and Mexican Avocado producers were shocked because their largest market was the U.S. 85% of Mexico's avocado goes to the U.S.A.

Mexican Avocado market is not a welcoming place for newcomers, as featured in Netflix's documentary Rotten. Local experts at Tridge were taking considerable personal risk to complete such deals. The Mexican Avocado market has a reputation for criminal gang involvement. Tridge's presence was not welcomed by traditional actors, evident by Tridge stickers routinely being ripped off mid-journey.

Tridge approached Mexican avocado producers with bold offers. Tridge traders traveled around orchards and offered to buy one thousand tons of avocados, an unprecedented offer. This came as a surprise to farmers, as the Mexico Avocado market is known for its exclusivity. Tridge, as a result of its request, instantly became a known name. Producers were wondering who and why Korean start-up is suddenly making such significant moves in the market.

Tridge was one of the first companies that helped export Avocados to China.

Tridge's Now and Future

Within a year, Tridge became a prominent player in the Mexican Avocado market.

Recently Tridge signed a long-term contract with a 60h-size orchard located in the state of Mexico. As active as Tridge is in acquiring new buyers, it is diligently working behind the scenes and in the fields to ensure a reliable supply for buyers worldwide.

To find out more click here

Minwoo Nam
Communication Manager

Tridge becomes influential in Mexico Avocado market
6 min read

Tridge becomes influential in Mexico Avocado market

Company
Mar 16
/
6 min read

Mexican Avocado farms, whose family runs avocado farms in the State of Mexico for three generations, recently closed the deal with a German distributor to sell tons of avocados.

It is unusual for a Mexican avocado orchard to export avocados to countries other than the United States. Many farmers are not familiar with developing new export channels and struggle with local regulations in different countries.

With its high reliance on the U.S. market, the Mexican Avocado market has a unique market dynamic. Here, instead of multiple intermediaries, the packing houses play an outsized role. Packing houses buy directly from orchards send it right to the shipments to importers at destination countries. In the process, orchards do not have comprehensive options to sell their products at competitive prices.

Tridge’s role

Provides competition

Tridge's impact here is firstly in providing competition to traditionally influential players. One key advantage of Tridge over packing houses is its ability to help jump the trade barriers. For example, when avocado farmers tried to export avocados to Germany, certain local food regulations hindered the process because it took too much time to keep the freshness of their products. Many buyers find themselves in a similar situation to Carlos.

Tridge recently helped the farmers to jump those hurdles on behalf of him. Tridge's one-stop fulfillment service facilitates this, including due diligence, supplier certificate verification, contract negotiation, packaging, shipping, customs, and many more.

Provides Consistency

Another advantage is Tridge's ability to provide consistency. One primary concern for avocado buyers is that they receive products in sizes they do not want. Furthermore, some suppliers fail to keep the freshness of avocado due to logistical failures.

Tridge offers buyers higher consistency in the combination of product grades ordered by the buyer, which has been their prime complaint towards packing houses.

For example, when a Canadian wholesaler from Montreal asked for 50% of avocado in a certain grade, Tridge kept that promise. As a result, this wholesaler came back with higher orders in the next season.

History of Tridge’s Mexican Avocado business

Tridge's business in Mexican Avocado dates back to 2019 when the Trump administration and Mexico clashed over the NAFTA deal. Trump administration threatened Mexico to nullify the NAFTA deal, and Mexican Avocado producers were shocked because their largest market was the U.S. 85% of Mexico's avocado goes to the U.S.A.

Mexican Avocado market is not a welcoming place for newcomers, as featured in Netflix's documentary Rotten. Local experts at Tridge were taking considerable personal risk to complete such deals. The Mexican Avocado market has a reputation for criminal gang involvement. Tridge's presence was not welcomed by traditional actors, evident by Tridge stickers routinely being ripped off mid-journey.

Tridge approached Mexican avocado producers with bold offers. Tridge traders traveled around orchards and offered to buy one thousand tons of avocados, an unprecedented offer. This came as a surprise to farmers, as the Mexico Avocado market is known for its exclusivity. Tridge, as a result of its request, instantly became a known name. Producers were wondering who and why Korean start-up is suddenly making such significant moves in the market.

Tridge was one of the first companies that helped export Avocados to China.

Tridge's Now and Future

Within a year, Tridge became a prominent player in the Mexican Avocado market.

Recently Tridge signed a long-term contract with a 60h-size orchard located in the state of Mexico. As active as Tridge is in acquiring new buyers, it is diligently working behind the scenes and in the fields to ensure a reliable supply for buyers worldwide.

To find out more click here

Minwoo Nam
Communication Manager