What It's Like to Work at Tridge
6 min read

What It's Like to Work at Tridge

Overseas
/
6 min read

Besim joined Tridge when he was offered a job after a freelance project with Tridge. He is now in charge of supporting the training and communication of engagement managers (EM, local trade experts) newly joining Tridge. Having a diverse cultural background as both Turkish and Bulgarian, he is willing to take new challenges connecting the members worldwide to interact and cooperate seamlessly.

What drew you to join Tridge?

What I did for Tridge, in the beginning, was a quick freelance project. After the two-day-long project, I forgot about the company, but they reached out to me to offer a full-time job opening for Turkey. It was then I started researching the company in depth to understand what it does. The idea of a digital platform connecting the supply and demand side of the food and agricultural market attracted me to join Tridge because it was innovative in global trade.


What is your typical day like?

It depends on the schedule, but what I usually do is scheduling the training sessions. I'm handling the training of new engagement managers (EM, local trade experts) across different regions, mainly Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and North America. I attend the training sessions, talk about the various subjects, and ask them to work on specific tasks or assignments.

I also follow up with them if they have any difficulties, such as technical issues. There are quite many questions and answers between the EMs in the training period, and they are addressing those to us mainly to other parties and colleagues. Depending on the schedule, if I'm having a training session with North America or Latin American countries, the day would end around 8 or 9 p.m.

 

What is the most challenging part of your job?

The most challenging part is scheduling calls with the Latin and North American EMs and having them in one group when their numbers are a lot. Because if they've just started working at Tridge and one of them has technical difficulties during an online session, then the training schedule and the week need to be readjusted for this specific EM. Another challenge is to schedule calls between Latin or North American EMs with HQ members because of the time difference.

What is best part of working with Tridge?

The best part of working with Tridge is to work with so many professionals on different levels, not only on the management side. I had the chance and the privilege to meet some people at the HQ by visiting. It gives a good feeling and a sense of belonging to a professional organization set to achieve success's growth plans and strategies.

 

Do you have any advice for someone who wants to join as an engagement manager?

What I notice from our engagement managers joining lately is that their age is quite diversified. So, my advice for those considering joining Tridge is that they should focus on the fact that Tridge is an organization with a management mindset that has a particular goal and is working towards executing these goals, regardless of how junior or senior the position is might seem.

It is result-oriented, and it also regards the staff and employees as part of the global family, no matter if they are remote or at the HQ. Also, there are many opportunities to grow together, not only career-wise but also in terms of the learning process. There are so many things to explore within the global trade, especially in food and agricultural products, that are even more volatile and fluctuate drastically.

So, it will help anyone joining Tridge to keep up with the market to become experts within the vast learning process. But here, one of the most crucial elements would be being open to change and the learning process every day.

 

What qualities are necessary?

Open communication and eagerness to learn new things are important because, back to the point I mentioned different age groups joining Tridge, they must be open to learning. They must be open to communication, like listening to each other and pursue constant coordination with colleagues with different levels such as the HQ or in different countries from our global network. This is because by listening, coordinating, and communicating with each other, we can identify opportunities.

 

What is Tridge’s competitive edge?

I think the extensive market intelligence service updated daily is one of the critical elements in differentiating Tridge from the others. Providing this as a service is a great plus, whereas most big trading companies or global traders don't have that or rely on external assistance.

Another element is the fact that the local presence and local network of Tridge are growing so fast. That's why I think the global network of Tridge will very soon exceed that of other international traders and trading companies.

 

How do you manage your schedule?

I think it's part of self-discipline. The key would be to distract from the fact that you are at home. Most of the time, it isn't easy because things happen like ringing doorbells or families at home. But, if you install a routine for yourself saying that you will work during a specific time frame or depending on the needs, it is pretty doable and manageable.

It is easier when you set the routine, because the good thing about working remotely is you can work from anywhere. You can go to another location not bound to your current home address while following up and working on your team. But on the other hand, the cons are that you are not working like 9 to 6 or 8 to 5. You are following up constantly because your computer is on, and then you want to catch up with everything, which is good but needs self-discipline. So I think that's one of the things that EMs should have.

Also, I believe that keeping the communication channels such as Slack on is very important. Internal communication is crucial because people will know you are online, giving them access to reach out to you and let them resolve issues quickly.

 

What’s the most memorable project in the past years?

Around two years ago, I was working on a sales project because I was trying to find some tomato suppliers in Turkey to meet the customer inquiry. Anyhow, I engaged with the suppliers and got a couple of them interested and got their offers.

Our model at that time was where suppliers claimed their account, and they made the offer themselves. The challenge was to get them to register and complete the offer, such as following the steps. I managed that the offer was sent, but then we couldn't follow up with the buyer if any other issues were being developed.

A couple of weeks later, I called the supplier back to see what they've been up to, and he told me that they closed the deal and made the sale to this buyer. It was a small export sale with just a couple of pallets by air freight. However, after that, this supplier became our very first premium supplier member from Turkey because they saw the value of Tridge that we provide trustworthy customers, which is fantastic.


Minwoo Nam
Communication Manager

What It's Like to Work at Tridge
6 min read

What It's Like to Work at Tridge

Overseas
/
6 min read

Besim joined Tridge when he was offered a job after a freelance project with Tridge. He is now in charge of supporting the training and communication of engagement managers (EM, local trade experts) newly joining Tridge. Having a diverse cultural background as both Turkish and Bulgarian, he is willing to take new challenges connecting the members worldwide to interact and cooperate seamlessly.

What drew you to join Tridge?

What I did for Tridge, in the beginning, was a quick freelance project. After the two-day-long project, I forgot about the company, but they reached out to me to offer a full-time job opening for Turkey. It was then I started researching the company in depth to understand what it does. The idea of a digital platform connecting the supply and demand side of the food and agricultural market attracted me to join Tridge because it was innovative in global trade.


What is your typical day like?

It depends on the schedule, but what I usually do is scheduling the training sessions. I'm handling the training of new engagement managers (EM, local trade experts) across different regions, mainly Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and North America. I attend the training sessions, talk about the various subjects, and ask them to work on specific tasks or assignments.

I also follow up with them if they have any difficulties, such as technical issues. There are quite many questions and answers between the EMs in the training period, and they are addressing those to us mainly to other parties and colleagues. Depending on the schedule, if I'm having a training session with North America or Latin American countries, the day would end around 8 or 9 p.m.

 

What is the most challenging part of your job?

The most challenging part is scheduling calls with the Latin and North American EMs and having them in one group when their numbers are a lot. Because if they've just started working at Tridge and one of them has technical difficulties during an online session, then the training schedule and the week need to be readjusted for this specific EM. Another challenge is to schedule calls between Latin or North American EMs with HQ members because of the time difference.

What is best part of working with Tridge?

The best part of working with Tridge is to work with so many professionals on different levels, not only on the management side. I had the chance and the privilege to meet some people at the HQ by visiting. It gives a good feeling and a sense of belonging to a professional organization set to achieve success's growth plans and strategies.

 

Do you have any advice for someone who wants to join as an engagement manager?

What I notice from our engagement managers joining lately is that their age is quite diversified. So, my advice for those considering joining Tridge is that they should focus on the fact that Tridge is an organization with a management mindset that has a particular goal and is working towards executing these goals, regardless of how junior or senior the position is might seem.

It is result-oriented, and it also regards the staff and employees as part of the global family, no matter if they are remote or at the HQ. Also, there are many opportunities to grow together, not only career-wise but also in terms of the learning process. There are so many things to explore within the global trade, especially in food and agricultural products, that are even more volatile and fluctuate drastically.

So, it will help anyone joining Tridge to keep up with the market to become experts within the vast learning process. But here, one of the most crucial elements would be being open to change and the learning process every day.

 

What qualities are necessary?

Open communication and eagerness to learn new things are important because, back to the point I mentioned different age groups joining Tridge, they must be open to learning. They must be open to communication, like listening to each other and pursue constant coordination with colleagues with different levels such as the HQ or in different countries from our global network. This is because by listening, coordinating, and communicating with each other, we can identify opportunities.

 

What is Tridge’s competitive edge?

I think the extensive market intelligence service updated daily is one of the critical elements in differentiating Tridge from the others. Providing this as a service is a great plus, whereas most big trading companies or global traders don't have that or rely on external assistance.

Another element is the fact that the local presence and local network of Tridge are growing so fast. That's why I think the global network of Tridge will very soon exceed that of other international traders and trading companies.

 

How do you manage your schedule?

I think it's part of self-discipline. The key would be to distract from the fact that you are at home. Most of the time, it isn't easy because things happen like ringing doorbells or families at home. But, if you install a routine for yourself saying that you will work during a specific time frame or depending on the needs, it is pretty doable and manageable.

It is easier when you set the routine, because the good thing about working remotely is you can work from anywhere. You can go to another location not bound to your current home address while following up and working on your team. But on the other hand, the cons are that you are not working like 9 to 6 or 8 to 5. You are following up constantly because your computer is on, and then you want to catch up with everything, which is good but needs self-discipline. So I think that's one of the things that EMs should have.

Also, I believe that keeping the communication channels such as Slack on is very important. Internal communication is crucial because people will know you are online, giving them access to reach out to you and let them resolve issues quickly.

 

What’s the most memorable project in the past years?

Around two years ago, I was working on a sales project because I was trying to find some tomato suppliers in Turkey to meet the customer inquiry. Anyhow, I engaged with the suppliers and got a couple of them interested and got their offers.

Our model at that time was where suppliers claimed their account, and they made the offer themselves. The challenge was to get them to register and complete the offer, such as following the steps. I managed that the offer was sent, but then we couldn't follow up with the buyer if any other issues were being developed.

A couple of weeks later, I called the supplier back to see what they've been up to, and he told me that they closed the deal and made the sale to this buyer. It was a small export sale with just a couple of pallets by air freight. However, after that, this supplier became our very first premium supplier member from Turkey because they saw the value of Tridge that we provide trustworthy customers, which is fantastic.


Minwoo Nam
Communication Manager